How to Keep a Baby’s Teeth Clean

Guest post by Edgar Hernandez

Can’t wait until your baby’s first tooth pops out? Or until that tooth falls out? Your baby’s teeth are not just fun memories for the scrapbook but essential placeholders for their future adult teeth. A top priority should be preventing wear, and speaking and chewing difficulties from ruining the fun.

Avoid Sugar

Sugar is the primary adversary here. The bacteria that feeds on the sugar releases an acid that eats away at your baby’s’ teeth. Regular milk and sugary juices should not be used as alternatives to water, breast milk, and formula.

Preteeth Care

Periodically check for brown and white spots which are signs of tooth decay. A sufficient amount of fluoride consumption is needed as well. If your baby does not use fluoride toothpaste (it is not always recommended until age three) then they should be drinking tap water with fluoride or taking fluoride supplements as the doctor recommends.

Oral hygiene is a lifelong process beginning as soon as life begins. Even before your child grows teeth be sure to wipe down their gums with a warm wet cloth after meals and before bed. This will clean out plaque-building bacteria, an important first step in tooth-decay prevention. Leading up to the age or during the period when their teeth are growing, you might want to get them accustomed to a toothbrush. You can use it without toothpaste until a they have a sufficient amount of teeth.

Teething

We all know that teething can be a dreadful experience for both the baby and the parents. To relieve both parties a bit use a teething ring or rub the baby’s gum with your finger (be sure to clean it first). Occasionally it is okay to use pain relievers like Tylenol but do not use aspirin or anything that contains benzocaine.

Brushing

When your baby finally has teeth to brush you will want to start with a rice-sized drop of toothpaste squeezed onto a toothbrush with a small head and a large handle. Even once they are able to hold the brush on their own you will want to supervise for a few years to ensure thoroughness and safety. It is preferable to supervise until they are old enough to control their swallowing and spitting.

And remember to schedule a dentist appointment between their first and third birthdays!

Sources: [WebMD, parents.com,

Edgar Hernandez is a successful South Florida businessman. He currently runs Bora Bora Pool Service in Weston FL

Written by 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *